Archaeolgical Research at Salve Regina University

Heather Rockwell and the students of CHP 399: Archaeological Curation

From the Ice Age to the Gilded Age: Archaeology at Salve Regina University

January 18-February 8, 2024

 

Opening Reception: January 18, 5:00-7:00 p.m.

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of From the Ice Age to the Gilded Age: Archaeological Research at Salve Regina University. This show will feature artifacts and research related to archaeological work within the Noreen Stonor Drexel Cultural and Historic Preservation Program. An opening reception is scheduled for the evening of Thursday, January 18th.

 

Archaeology seeks to help us understand the past through the objects people left behind. This exhibition will take visitors on a journey through New England’s past with the help of artifacts recovered by Salve students on archaeological excavations conducted in northern Maine and on the grounds of Ochre Court in Newport, Rhode Island. These two sites span thousands of years from the time of the earliest indigenous hunter-gatherers who walked beside the woolly mammoths, to the 19th century east coast elite who used Newport as their summer playground. This exhibit seeks to highlight how archaeologists understand the past and the people whose lives shaped it by showcasing the research currently happening on our campus.

 

This exhibition was co-curated by Dr. Heather Rockwell, Assistant Professor in the Cultural and Historic Preservation and Sociology/Anthropology programs in the Department of Cultural, Environmental, and Global Studies and Kaleigh Trischman a junior double major in Cultural and Historic Preservation and Sociology/Anthropology. The project was designed in conjunction with a group of student curatorial assistants from an advanced preservation course. The course offers students the opportunity to learn how to research, interpret, and care for cultural objects.

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is located in the Antone Academic Center on the campus of Salve. It is handicap accessible with parking along Lawrence Avenue and Leroy Avenue. Its exhibits are open to the public Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesdays and Fridays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Saturdays and Sundays from Noon to 4 p.m. The gallery is closed on Mondays.

CURSIVE and CLAY

November 9 – December 10, 2023

 

Opening Reception:  November 9, 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

Gallery Talk with the Artists:  November 9, 6:00 – 6:30 p.m.

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of Cursive and Clay, an exhibition of new and recent work combining language and clay.  This group exhibition highlights the work of three contemporary ceramic artists and educators from New England: Justin Gerace, Kathy King and Stephanie Lanter.

 

The union of written text and ceramic form can be traced back to the ancient world.  From the earliest clay tokens and cuneiform tablets, a vast array of “cursive and clay” amalgams has emerged that includes coins, tiles, buttons, pottery and more.  This exhibition reflects on that rich history by exploring the innovative treatment of text, writing, graffiti, pictographs, inscriptions, and other forms of cursive expression in ceramics today.

 

Justin Gerace injects the grittiness of urban life into functional ceramics.  Drawing inspiration from the lyrical storytelling of hip-hop and the graffitied environments of the city, Gerace depicts a landscape at full boil, one bubbling over with juxtapositions of imagery and text.  His stoneware platters and vases become active receptacles for his lived experience and his observations on social and political unrest.  Gerace is an adjunct Lecturer in Ceramics at Salve Regina University.

 

Cultural issues and personal narratives enliven the ceramic vessels of Kathy King.  Trained as printmaker, King employs a range of subtractive drawing and carving methods on thrown porcelain.  Her work constructs charged relationships between text and image while navigating the politics and poetics of identity from a feminist point of view.  Kathy King is Director of the Ceramics Program and Visual Arts Initiatives at the Office for the Arts at Harvard.

 

Stephanie Lanter’s layered ceramic sculptures often spring from her own writing and meditation on a single word or phrase.  Lanter interrogates language to the point of its embodiment.  By contemplating the dimensions of each utterance, she coaxes handwritten liquid clay to deform, coagulate and blossom into new dynamic states of expression and solid form.  Lanter is Associate Professor of Ceramics at the University of Harford Art School.

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is located in the Antone Academic Center on the campus of Salve Regina.  It is a fully accessible space with parking along Lawrence Avenue and Leroy Avenue.  Cursive and Clay is open to the public Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.; Wednesdays and Fridays from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; and Saturdays and Sundays from Noon to 4:00 p.m.  The gallery is closed on Mondays and November 22 -27 for the Thanksgiving holiday.

ERNEST JOLICOEUR: ERASED LANDSCAPES

Ernest Jolicoeur: Erased Landscapes

October 5 – November 2, 2023

 

Opening Reception:  October 5, 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

Lecture:  October 5, 6:00 – 6:30 p.m.

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of Ernest Jolicoeur: Erased Landscapes, an exhibition of recent paintings and drawings by Ernest Jolicoeur, Associate Professor of Art and Gallery Director at Salve Regina University.  An opening reception and artist talk are scheduled for the evening of Thursday, October 5.

 

In his series titled Erased Landscapes, Jolicoeur explores the memory of place and the place of memory as agents of image making.  His acrylic paintings and collage drawings depict a world of charged spaces and architectural structures shaped by the forces of memory, observation, and imagination.  Each work offers a unique composite of abstract and representational elements that are pressed together into a new hybrid landscape.  These works invite us to journey to a place just out of reach, like a childhood home or a temporary Covid test site.

 

Jolicoeur’s work draws equally from both the natural world and the built environment.  His paintings combine fleeting sensations of light, temperature, and atmosphere with fragmentary traces of landscape, architecture, and the human figure.  His work reimagines the poetic capacity for abstract painting to embody his lived experience of place.

 

This is Ernest Jolicoeur’s first solo exhibition at Salve Regina’s Hamilton Gallery.  It features work from his recent sabbatical.  Jolicoeur received his BFA from Rhode Island College and his MFA from Yale University.  He exhibits his work nationally and internationally.  Most recently he exhibited his drawings in Newport at the contemporary art gallery Overlap.  Other local venues include the RISD Museum, Roger Williams University, and Brown University’s Bell Gallery.  He also has an extensive record of exhibitions in New York that includes the Museum of Modern Art PS1, VOLTA, Feature Inc., Silverstein Gallery and ArtPort Kingston.  His work has received numerous honors and awards including three fellowships from the Rhode State Council of the Arts.  In 2022, Jolicoeur and Anthony Mangieri, Salve Regina Associate Professor of Art History, co-authored Muse and Mercy: Exploring Fine and Decorative Arts at Salve Regina University to highlight the significance of art on Salve’s campus.

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is located in the Antone Academic Center on the campus of Salve Regina.  It is a fully accessible space with parking along Lawrence Avenue and Leroy Avenue.  Its exhibits are open to the public Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesdays and Fridays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Saturdays and Sundays from Noon to 4 p.m.  The gallery is closed on Mondays.

Senior Juried Show 2023

May 4th  –  May 21st  2023

 

Sydney Austin

James Arcoleo

Michaela Conway

Courtney Collibee

Amara D’Antuono

Patricia Jurkowski

Ray North

Rory Smith

Alexa Winter

 

Opening Reception Friday May 19th 5-7pm

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of the Art and Art History Department’s Senior Juried Show featuring graduating senior Art major students Sydney Austin, James Arcoleo, Michaela Conway, Courtney Collibee, Amara D’Antuono, Patricia Jurkowski, Ray North, Rory Smith and Alexa Winter. An opening reception for the artists is scheduled for Friday May 19th  from 5 – 7pm.

 

Sydney Austin is a Illustration and Graphic Design Concentrator whose work revolves around the development of her graphic novel, titled, The Phoenix of the South. Bringing the darkness to light, the primary theme that Austin shares in her art is mental health, specifically how people hide their true feelings for fear of being stigmatized.  Sydney connects with her audience by inserting her own struggles in her characters to tell people about what goes on inside her head.  Instead of rushing to finish the whole novel, she decided to produce a series of volumes so that her readers could grow alongside the characters.

 

James Arcoleo is a Graphic Design Concentrator whose work focuses on linear portraits with text and drawing.  His work has a macabe melancholy that is challenged by bright red scrawled graffiti-like emotional statements.  He works with skeletal figures, sad clowns and snakes, all with a toxic edge and a burning desire to engage with anger and complacency.

 

Michaela Conway is a Graphic Design and Interactive Media Concentrator whose work is an exploration of brand identity design that reflects her interests as a graphic designer. In creating the brand Florence, Conway drew inspiration from the Newport mansions on Salve Regina’s campus, allowing the intricate architectural details to accentuate the luxurious aesthetic of her clothing line. She first developed a brand identity, focused on translating the opulence of Ochre Court and the Vinland Estate into a fashion line and logo design. From there, she designed a fashion catalog, packaging, website, and a video campaign. Her installation in the Hamilton Gallery is a pop-up shop that allows for an immersive consumer experience for the viewer that projects the luxurious aesthetic of Florence.

 

Courtney Collibee is a Illustration Concentrator whose painted work is deeply collaborative.  She curates poses based on how her models answer questions like: “what is your biggest fear?” or “what do you feel is something most people don’t know about you?” to form a story line of their character in the image.  Her goal is to achieve noticeabe tension in the dynamic between model and artist, to capture them in vulnerable moments.

 

Amara D’Autuono is a Graphic Design, Interactive Media and Photography Concentrator who enjoys working with many mediums. Her thesis project is the perfect example of this

combination. Her project is based around the comfort that one should feel in their own

home. Using Revit and Enscape, she created hyper realistic 3-dimensional renderings to

trick the eye into thinking that the spaces are real. She turned these renderings into a

magazine entitled Jules, named after the interior designer of Ochre Court.

 

Patricia Jurkowski’s is a Painting and Illustration Concentrator who makes dark figurative oil paintings.  Her body of work centers on the relationship between the viewer and the figures. Jurkowski composes provocative images that first aim to shock the viewer, then garner further thought. The subjects are trapped behind the glass of viewership, destined to exist only as a spectacle in the memory of whoever gazes at them. They are unforgettable, yet easily judged on the surface. They are unexplainable upon initial sight yet force you to ponder why they exist.

 

Ray North is a Graphic Design Concentrator whose work plumbs psychological depths with hard edged graphic portraits like “Horseface” and his quiet, limited palette “Self Portrait.  He also  engages with a wry sense of humor in the sweet and funny Meyers Briggs survey “Find Your Personality” video.  This humor plays with the self-seriousness of the idea of a personality test by pairing cartoons and movie characters with their MBTI personalities.  His bashful portrait keeps a watchful eye over the whole endeavor.

 

Rory Smith is a Interactive Media and Graphic Design Concentraor whose work explores the intersection of the real and surreal.  He strives to create images that captivate and terrify.  His goal is to push the boundaires of what is possible in visual storytelling, using the latest digital tools and techniques to bring his vision to life.  In his work as a UX designer, he approaches each project with a focus on usability, accessibility and aesthetics.  By combining his skills as a graphic artist, illustrator and UX designer, he aims to bring a unique perspective to the world of digital media.

 

Alexa Winter is a Painting Concentrator whose painting and drawing describe a sense of place.  In “Park Brunch” we are looking at an ample active scene filled with figures dining and ambling through a lush space.  The bright, active line of her oil pastel is antic, active, allowing the drawing to come to life, to vibrate.  The scale of the drawing, dripping almost to the floor allows us entrance to a scene of half abstraction, half energy.  Meanwhile “2010” is a bright swamp, dripping off a canvas with drooping brilliance, slow, melting.  It is at once here with us and sinking away.

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is located in the Antone Academic Center on the campus of Salve Regina. It is handicap accessible with parking along Lawrence Avenue and Leroy Avenue. Its exhibits are open to the public, though our regular hours will be a bit limited through the run of this show as the students are in finals period.  We will have some of our regular monitored hours May 6-21st on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesdays and Fridays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Saturdays and Sundays from Noon to 4 p.m. The gallery is closed on Mondays.  If you miss us during this time, please contact [email protected] to make an appointment to see the show or do come to the opening on May 19th from 5-7pm.

Vitruvian Women: Senior Honors Thesis Show

April 13th – April 27th, 2023

Opening Reception Thursday April 13th  5-7pm

 

Sydney Austin

Michaela Conway

Amara D’Antuono

Patricia Jurkowski

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of the Art and Art History Department’s Senior Honors Thesis Show “Vitruvian Women” featuring graduating honors students Sydney Austin, Michaela Conway, Amara D’Antuono and Patricia Jurkowski. An opening reception with short artist talks is scheduled for Thursday April 13th from 5 – 7pm.

 

Sydney Austin’s thesis project revolves around the development of her graphic novel, titled, The Phoenix of the South. Bringing the darkness to light, the primary theme that Austin shares in her art is mental health, specifically how people hide their true feelings for fear of being stigmatized.  Sydney connects with her audience by inserting her own struggles in her characters to tell people about what goes on inside her head.  Instead of rushing to finish the whole novel, she decided to produce a series of volumes so that her readers could grow alongside the characters.

 

Michaela Conway’s thesis project is an exploration of brand identity design that reflects her interests as a graphic designer. In creating the brand Florence, Conway drew inspiration from the Newport mansions on Salve Regina’s campus, allowing the intricate architectural details to accentuate the luxurious aesthetic of her clothing line. She first developed a brand identity, focused on translating the opulence of Ochre Court and the Vinland Estate into a fashion line and logo design. From there, she designed a fashion catalog, packaging, website, and a video campaign. Her installation in the Hamilton Gallery is a pop-up shop that allows for an immersive consumer experience for the viewer that projects the luxurious aesthetic of Florence.

 

As an artist, Amara D’Autuono enjoys working with many mediums such as graphic design, interactive media, and photography. Her thesis project is the perfect example of this combination. Her project is based around the comfort that one should feel in their own home. Using Revit and Enscape, she created hyper realistic 3-dimensional renderings to trick the eye into thinking that the spaces are real. She turned these renderings into a magazine entitled Jules, named after the interior designer of Ochre Court.

 

Patricia Jurkowski’s thesis work is a group of large figurative oil paintings.  The body of work centers on the relationship between the viewer and the figures. Jurkowski composed provocative images that first aim to shock the viewer, then garner further thought. The subjects are trapped behind the glass of viewership, destined to exist only as a spectacle in the memory of whoever gazes at them. They are unforgettable, yet easily judged on the surface. They are unexplainable upon initial sight yet force you to ponder why they exist. The second painting in the series, titled Painter and the Painted, forces those outside the painting to exist as part of the composition, connecting their gaze with the figures.

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is located in the Antone Academic Center on the campus of Salve Regina. It is handicap accessible with parking along Lawrence Avenue and Leroy Avenue. Its exhibits are open to the public Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesdays and Fridays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Saturdays and Sundays from Noon to 4 p.m. The gallery is closed on Mondays.

Do or Don’t Do It Yourself: A Paint by Number Show

Do or Don’t Do It Yourself

A Paint by Number Show

February 23rd –  March 30th, 2023

 

Kate Bae

Jenny Brown

Katie Commodore

Teresa Cox

Marjorie Hellman

Lori Larusso

Ghost of A Dream

Will Hutnick

Jodie Mim Goodnough

Karl LaRocca

J Myszka Lewis

Jerry Mischak

Kristen Schiele

Jen Shepard

Michelle Weinberg

Lauren Whearty

Jamie Vasta

 

Visiting Adjunct Curator Kirstin Lamb

 

Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery

Salve Regina University

 

Opening Reception February 23rd  5-7pm

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of our group show “Do or Don’t Do It Yourself: A Paint by Number Show”.  An opening reception with short conversations with several of the included artists is scheduled for Thursday, February 23rd, at 5:30 p.m.

 

If anyone can make it, why is it art?  Why should an artist be interested?

 

At once an emblem of mindless conformity, leisure time, the machine age and the possibilities of collaboration with the machine, the paint by number continues to inspire artists, despite its purported bad reputation.  The form of paint by number democratizes painting, heralding the moment when you too, could be a painter.

 

This show gathers a range of artists working with painting, sculpture, textiles, and drawing and looks at the leisure activity and hard-edged readymade as it has influenced a range of contemporary American artist’s aesthetics.

 

What is possible now that we can use computers to generate patterns once done by hand?  What does a paint by number become in the digital age?  What does it symbolize?  Why would an artist want to use that symbolism and aesthetic?

 

As a curator and an artist, I find myself gravitating to work that I feel is in some way influenced by the paint by number, either its high color and hard edges or its readymade order-from-the-internet art objects.  One can get photographs printed as canvases of number gridded textiles, plans for embroideries, paintings and more, thanks to the advancements in printing, graphics and 3d printing.

 

Some of the artists in this show were initially uncomfortable with the idea of being included in a show about Paint by Number aesthetics.  As an artist and curator, I love the art form, and use it in my work, but I can understand the hesitation.  I am not judging the work as less than, or without skill.  I am looking for evidence of the machine, the aesthetic of the edges of the form. We have easy access to photo processing programs in our computers and phones and that changes our visual lexicon, the high color and sharp edges spend a greater time in our field of view.

 

This is at once a celebration of a democratic art form and a salutation to that form in many different conceptual and painterly art practices.

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is located in the Antone Academic Center on the campus of Salve Regina. It is handicap accessible with parking along Lawrence Avenue and Leroy Avenue. Its exhibits are open to the public Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesdays and Fridays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Saturdays and Sundays from Noon to 4 p.m. The gallery is closed on Mondays.

 

For the run of this show, the gallery will also be closed for Salve Regina’s Spring Break, Saturday March 11th – Sunday March 19th, please be aware of these hours.

Amy Beecher: Lifestyle Pictures

January 26th – February 16th, 2023

Opening Reception January 26th 5-7 pm

 

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of artist Amy Beecher’s solo show Lifestyle Pictures.  An opening reception with short artist talk is scheduled for the artist on Thursday, January 26th, at 5 p.m.

 

Lifestyle Pictures represents the newest collection of artist Amy Beecher’s digital paintings and photographs. Beecher composes from an archive of found and original photographic and painterly assets and feeds them into a script to create an endless array of complex and chance compositions. Included in this archive are staged photographs, produced on a set decorated to evoke a generic and gentrified domestic imaginary: yoga blocks, begonia plants, beige couches and Beecher and her young child. The archive also includes an array of domestic detritus from her own home-including toddler boogers and the odd household dust bunny. The resulting compositions evoke equally the aspirational vision boards ubiquitous on social media, early modernist geometric abstraction. Beecher herself has discussed her work as a kind of “wine mom glitch abstraction.”

 

Leaves and vistas are flattened by Mondrian-inspired grids. Enormous chicks emerge from behind gigantic exercise bands. In photographs Beecher images herself working on digital collages, sometimes alone, sometimes with her son, eschewing The Studio for a kitchen table, a living room floor. Beecher pushes us to examine the poetics of the banal through the lens of a digital painter alongside her daily home life and routine. The humor of the work comes in its willingness to thumb its nose at serious painting in favor of a kind of deliberately faulty facture, hiding the sure hand of a painter schooled in the misadventures of modernism behind the digital glitch of a system she designs.  Lifestyle Pictures is at its heart both a meditation on digital painting and documentation of a marriage, a domestic life, a space curated and repackaged. What is formal picture making here and what is emotional?  What is produced by Beecher herself, and what emerges from larger systems? Beecher asks questions of the formal space of the gallery as well as the studio, making it all her personal vision board, but slant.

 

Amy Beecher is a visual artist living between Southern Vermont and New York City. She creates immersive installations that combine image, performance, and text. In 2020 she joined the faculty of Emerson College as Assistant Professor of Visual Art and Media Studies. Beecher’s work has been presented nationally through exhibitions and public programs at  Hesse Flatow, The International Center for Photography, Creative Time, Printed Matter, Bruce High Quality Foundation, Eye Level BQE Gallery, and Muelensteen Gallery, all in New York, NY; Torrance Shipman Gallery, 7 Dunham Place, Garden Party Arts and Primetime, all in Brooklyn, NY; GRIN and Providence College-Galleries, both in Providence, RI; The New Art Center, Newton, MA; Storm King Art Center, New Windsor, NY; and Philadelphia Photo Arts Center and Tiger Strikes Asteroid, both in Philadelphia, PA. She has been a fellow in interdisciplinary art at The Macdowell Colony, Peterborough, NH and an artist-in-residence at The New Art Center, Newton, MA, The Shandaken Project, Shandaken, NY and the Digital Media Center for Art at Yale University, New Haven, CT.  Her podcast, a growing archive of dialogues with other artists from 2013 onward, is The Amy Beecher Show.

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is located in the Antone Academic Center on the campus of Salve Regina. It is handicap accessible with parking along Lawrence Avenue and Leroy Avenue. Its exhibits are open to the public Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesdays and Fridays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Saturdays and Sundays from Noon to 4 p.m. The gallery is closed on Mondays.

 

Kirstin Lamb: Guest Curator and Gallery Manager for Spring 2023

Muse and Mercy: Celebrating 75 Years of Art at Salve Regina University

Muse and Mercy:

Celebrating 75 Years of Art at Salve Regina University

November 10 – December 11, 2022

Opening Reception:  Thursday, November 10, 2022 from 5:00 to 7:00 pm

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery and Salve Regina University’s Department of Art and Art History are pleased to announce the opening of Muse and Mercy:  Celebrating 75 Years of Art at Salve Regina University, an exhibition showcasing the University’s diverse collection of fine and decorative arts.

 

The exhibition Muse and Mercy:  Celebrating 75 Years of Art at Salve Regina University recognizes the University’s outstanding commitment to the visual arts on the occasion of the institution’s 75th Anniversary.  In the Hamilton Gallery, a wide range of artworks from various locations across campus are exhibited together for the first time.  The show presents a selection of paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, rare books, textiles, and metalwork along with photographic and video documentation of Gilded Age works on campus that cannot be displayed in the gallery.  Highlights include a number of rarely seen works, such as two Oscar de la Renta dresses and a group of John Howard Benson drawings, both from the University’s Special Collections.

 

This exhibition accompanies the publication of a forthcoming book on the University’s art collections entitled, Muse and Mercy: Exploring Fine and Decorative Arts at Salve Regina University.  Professors Ernest Jolicoeur and Anthony F. Mangieri of Salve Regina University’s Department of Art and Art History collaborated in writing this book and curating the exhibition.  Jolicoeur and Mangieri worked with a team of students in an upper-level community-engaged Art History class called Engaging Communities:  New Experiences in Art History and Museums to co-curate the exhibition and create videos in the show.

 

Muse and Mercy: Celebrating 75 Years of Art at Salve Regina University runs from November 10 through December 11, 2022.  On Thursday, November 10, the Salve community and general public are invited to attend an opening reception.  The reception will run from 5:00 to 7:00 pm in the Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery.

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is located in the Antone Academic Center on the campus of Salve Regina University.  It is handicap accessible with parking along Lawrence and Leroy Avenues.  Its exhibits are open Tuesdays through Thursdays 11:00 to 6:00 pm, Wednesdays and Fridays 11:00 to 5:00 pm, and Saturdays and Sundays noon to 4:00 pm.  The gallery is closed on Mondays.  We invite you to visit us.

Character Appeal: Portraits from the Newport Art Museum

CHARACTER APPEAL:

Portraits from the Newport Art Museum

 

October 6 – November 3, 2022

Opening Reception:  Thursday, October 6, 2022 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm

 

The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery and Salve Regina University’s Department of Art and Art History are pleased to announce the opening of Character Appeal: Portraits from the Newport Art Museum, an exhibition of portraiture from the 18th to 21st centuries.

 

Character Appeal: Portraits from the Newport Art Museum examines likeness, identity and personality through the timeless subject of portraiture.  This exhibition presents seventeen artworks on loan from the Newport Art Museum, featuring a range of paintings, drawings, prints, and photographs.  Highlights include a Japanese woodblock print from 1796 and an oil portrait of the writer and suffragist Julia Ward Howe from the 1890s.  The exhibition features numerous artworks with Newport ties, including paintings by Christopher Benson and Freedley Durr, a wood engraving by John La Farge, and a pencil drawing by Howard Gardiner Cushing.  This collection of portraits offers images of youth and age, individuals and couples, the costumed and the contemplative, the everyday and the reimagined.

 

A generous partnership with the Newport Art Museum made this exhibition possible.  This curated selection of portraits was organized in collaboration with a community engaged learning course co-taught by Professors Ernest Jolicoeur and Anthony F. Mangieri of Salve Regina University’s Department of Art and Art History.

 

Character Appeal: Portraits from the Newport Art Museum runs from October 6 through November 3, 2022.  On Thursday, October 6 the university community and general public are invited to attend an opening reception.  The reception will run from 6:00 to 8:00 pm in the Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery.

 

IMAGE CREDIT:

John Elliott
Portrait of Julia Ward Howe, c.1890
Oil on canvas
Courtesy of the Newport Art Museum; Gift of Rosalys Hall (grand-niece of Maud Howe Elliott)
2006.002.001